Sunday, 13 December 2015

IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO IDENTIFY A PIT BULL?

For additional accurate information on the public safety Danger of Pit Bull Type Dogs visit:

http://www.dogsbite.org/

http://www.daxtonsfriends.com/

http://www.animals24-7.org/category/dogs-cats/dogs/
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IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO IDENTIFY A PIT BULL?

The legal definition of a pit bull is a class of dogs that includes American pit bull terrier, American Staffordshire terrier, Staffordshire bull terrier, American bulldog and any other pure bred or mixed breed dog that is a combination of these dogs, dogsbite.org says. Weight and shape can vary significantly among pit bulls from 35 to 100 or more pounds.

Dogsbite.org also says scientific proof of a dog's breed is not required to enforce breed-specific laws nor is it required to properly identify a dog breed. “Misidentification tricks and theatrics were constructed by pro-pit bull and animal welfare groups and endure today for one class of dogs only: pit bulls,” it says.

More than 935 communities nationwide have enacted pit bull ordinances and several have claimed on dogsbite.org that their legislation has made their communities safer.

The Myth:

No one can correctly identify a pit bull. Fighting breed advocates claim that most people shown a collage of dog photos online can’t tell which one is the pit bull.

The Reality:

A recent ASPCA study in Virginia revealed that 93% of shelter workers were able to properly identify a “pit bull,” meaning one of the three closely-related (or identical) breeds above.

Many pit bull advocate groups post a collage of dog pictures online and ask the public to “identify the pit bull”.

What the public does not know is that the majority of dogs pictured are shot from camera angles deliberately designed to mislead. In addition, they show heads only, so size cannot be considered—this would not be the case when seeing the dog in real life.

They also feature many rare breeds that are related to pit bulls, but which are extremely uncommon in the United States (e.g., the Dogue de Bordeaux, Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog, and Ca de Bou).

And one of the dog breeds that is included is an American Staffordshire Terrier which is the exact same breed as the American Pit Bull Terrier, but registered with another organization.

It should also be noted that many humane societies offer discounts on spaying/neutering of pit bulls. If pit bulls are so difficult to identify, then how do shelter workers identify who qualifies for the discount?

There are also many pit bull rescues with the term “pit bull” in the organization name. How do these groups know which dogs to rescue?

Please pick out a dog show to attend. Any dog show. They are held in every state, every weekend . They are all judged on a visual identification system.

Every dog show ever held has been judged on a visual identification system. Judges not only identify breeds but also minute deviations from breed standard. Watch the judges work.

Humans are capable of this and do it all the time. You can pick out a Poodle or a Pug, Irish Setter or Wolfhound, Corgi or Chihuahua but you have difficulty identifying a breed that you state is anywhere from 5% to 40% of the dogs in America?

The material that I have linked to is very clear that the ASPCA is telling us that their shelter volunteers can correctly identify pit bulls 96% of the time.

Here’s the point: The NCRC uses the DNA when it is convenient to do so. It knows full well that the test does not test for “pit bull” and will often pick it up as other breeds, but it does not tell its readers.

It then uses the mix of other breeds to declare the dogs not pit bulls. Then it uses this sham of an experiment as cited research in their fatality reports to prove they can’t identify pit bulls.